Image
Call for Submissions for Exhibit on 

Indigenous Peoples’ Housing and Sustainable Settlements At the United Nations 

(On the occasion of the 14 Session of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues)

GENERAL INFORMATION 

For its annual exhibit on a global theme of relevance to indigenous peoples, the Secretariat of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues will be organizing an exhibit on Indigenous Peoples’ Housing and Sustainable Settlements. The exhibit will be open during the annual session of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, from 20 April to 1 May 2015. The exhibit will be shown at the Visitors’ Lobby, General Assembly Building, United Nations Headquarters, New York, USA.

The Secretariat calls for submission of photographs, artworks and videos from artists/producers for the exhibit that demonstrate indigenous ways of housing and architecture and knowledge of sustainable settlements.

ELIGIBILITY 

Eligibility of submissions is in compliance with the theme of the exhibit. Preference will be given to submissions from indigenous persons or groups.

SUBMISSION DETAILS 

Images or artworks 

A selection of maximum 20 pieces of photography or artwork images for consideration, one image per piece with a corresponding caption (20 words maximum), may be submitted. Only JPEG images, not exceeding 5MB each will be accepted.

Videos 

A selection of maximum 2 videos for consideration with a short overview for each video may be submitted. They can email web link to video(s) on the Internet or file sharing sites such as Dropbox. Videos must not be longer than 5 minutes and copyrighted under the name of the producer or letter of consent from copyright holder should be sent along.

Images of the artworks and web links for the videos may be submitted by e-mail by 30 January 2015 to unpfii.exhibits@gmail.com. 

Submissions can be made in English, French, Russian or Spanish.

ARTIST STATEMENT 

In order to assist the Exhibit organizers with our goal to promote indigenous artists and to educate the public regarding the importance of the special theme for indigenous peoples, please provide the following information in your submission:

  • Brief explanation (100 to 200 words maximum) of each image.
  • Brief biography of artist (100 to 200 words maximum). This biography should include the artist’s indigenous identity.

JURY 

The UN Exhibit Committee will review all of the art show submissions. Organizers may edit your statements.

Notification of featured artists will be e-mailed to individual artists by 15 March 2015, and posted on the Permanent Forum website www.un.org/indigenous.

Click here to download this call for submissions in PDF

Posted in News | Leave a comment

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

The International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)  is inviting indigenous peoples’ organizations and communities, and organizations that work with them, to apply for grants that fund projects and partnerships to promote the development of indigenous peoples and their unique cultural identity.

Grants ranging from US$20,000 to US$50,000 will be awarded to applicants from IFAD’s developing Member States through the Indigenous Peoples Assistance Facility (IPAF).

You can find more information on application requirements and an application form here. 

The closing date for applications is 6 March 2015. IFAD will not accept applications after that date.

Posted in News | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Please consider supporting the Education, Leadership and Rights Training for Indigenous Girls in East Africa, now in its fifth year, which helps to educate Maasai young women from Kenya and Tanzania and provide leadership training and mentoring so that they can become advocates and leaders of women and Indigenous Peoples.  All of our participants have graduated from high school and are now in higher education. They are currently studying a wide range of subjects from women’s studies to environmental preservation and journalism. 
The program was created in 2008 by Tribal Link with three indigenous organization partners – SIMOO, IIN and PAICODEO – and US-based NGO Brighter Green, to support a small cohort of girls from the beginning of high school through their university graduation. The intent of the program is to invest deeply in a small number of girls who have exhibited great potential, but whose progress has been impeded by their community’s economic condition. Access to education in the region is rare; less than 10% of the general population receives a high school degree. For Indigenous girls in the area, the rate is even more startling: less than 1% of Maasai girls finish high school.

As we continue to nurture these young leaders, we also encourage you to make a donation to help support the increasing costs of higher education.

☐    $250 ­– Provide transportation and books for one girl for a full year

☐    $500 – Provide room and board for one girl for a full year

☐ $1,000 – Provide tuition for one girl for a full year

☐ $1,500 – Provide tuition for one girl for a full year and participation in human rights training

☐ $2,000 – Support one girl for a full year, including tuition, room and board, books, travel, and participation in the human rights training

To send a tax-deductible donation, please click here.

For more information on the program, please take a look at the program page, here.

Posted in News | Leave a comment

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

This document was prepared by the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), through the Latin American and Caribbean Demographic Centre (CELADE)-Population Division of ECLAC, under the supervision of Dirk Jaspers-Faijer. This study was carried out at the request of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII) and the Continental Network of Indigenous Women of the Americas, with support from the Ford Foundation.

Description

As the twenty-first century advances, the countries of Latin America are building deeper democracies and looking critically at the development process, in the growing conviction that development should focus on equality and be approached on the basis of rights. This means tackling the region’s persistent inequalities, especially those affecting indigenous peoples, who have historically suffered exclusion and discrimination. It also means guaranteeing indigenous people both the enjoyment of human rights on an equal footing to the rest of society, and the right to be collectively different. This is a challenge for this century, which began with the recognition of the rights of indigenous people and the role they unquestionably play on national and international agendas.

Table of contents

Foreword .

– Introduction .

– I. Background and sociopolitical context of indigenous peoples’ rights in Latin America .

– II. Mapping the demographics of indigenous peoples: counting is relevant .

– III. Territorial rights and spatial mobility of indigenous peoples in Latin America .

– IV. The right to well-being of indigenous peoples .

– V. Right to information and communication.

Click here to download the full document. Available in English and Spanish.

Posted in News | Leave a comment

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

The Third (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural) Committee of the General Assembly has today approved its annual resolution on the rights of indigenous peoples (A/C.3/69/L.27) by consensus. The resolution urges governments and the UN system to undertake, in consultation and cooperation with indigenous peoples, follow up actions to the recently held World Conference on Indigenous Peoples and decides to convene a high-level event to mark the 10th anniversary of the adoption of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, among other actions.

Click here for the full text of the resolution.

Posted in News | Leave a comment

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

The publication prepared by the Secretariat of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (SPFII) aims to promote the application of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

It presents good practices that showcase the UN system’s policy and programming work based on partnerships with indigenous peoples. The experiences and practices highlighted can offer useful insights on policy and programming approaches to implement the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and advance the right to self-determination of indigenous peoples.

It is however not an exhaustive inventory of the experiences of the UN system. The case studies and projects profiled demonstrate how partnering with indigenous nations, peoples and communities is integral to the success of UN policies, programmes and projects.

Experiences presented in the publication identify:

  • Entry points for specific interventions that advance the rights of indigenous peoples;
  • Bottlenecks and challenges encountered when addressing vulnerabilities of indigenous peoples;
  • Strategies and key features of an enabling environment for ensuring the full and effective participation of indigenous peoples; and
  • Processes and mechanisms aimed at addressing marginalisation, extreme poverty and other human rights violations experienced by indigenous peoples.

In terms of institutional learning, it is hoped that the experiences highlighted contribute to the sharpening of programmes, strategies and advocacy efforts to implement, strengthen or scale up activities with indigenous peoples.

The compilation is also oriented towards the sharing of practical knowledge that will underpin efforts of the UN system to reaffirm the spirit, principles and rights enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Click here to download the publication.

Posted in News | Leave a comment

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

By Madeline McGill

Climate change impacts people everywhere. Rising temperatures and sea levels are only some of the many ways that carbon emissions and other forms of pollution are affecting the planet.

Some countries are combating the ramifications of climate change better than others. After years of reliance, curbing a nation’s dependency on fossil fuels takes time. However, for many Pacific Islanders, time is a luxury they cannot afford.

Due to their small size, low elevation, and remote locations, many Pacific nations are combating rising sea levels, rising saltwater tables, increased storm activity and drier climate conditions as a direct result of climate change. It is because of this thatGermanwatch’s Global Climate Risk Index of 2014 lists Pacific nations within the 10 most vulnerable in the world to the impacts of climate change.

The New Agriculturalist states that a temperature rise of 2-4 degrees Celsius could inflict up to $1 billion in damages to New Guinea alone. The Asian Development Bank’s The Economics of Climate Change in the Pacific further argues that the region is estimated to require $447 million per year until 2050 to deal with losses to GDP.

However, Pacific Islanders are not drowning. They’re fighting.

Warriors of the Pacific are rising to peacefully defend the Pacific Islands from further damage. Joining with the global climate change movement 350.org, 350 Pacific is a movement of people from different backgrounds uniting together for a common purpose: to stop climate change in its tracks.

This October, climate warriors from 12 different Pacific nations launched a successful campaign in Australia to voice their concerns against the lack of response from Australia’s government in regard to coal exports.

According to The World Coal Association, Australia is within the top five coal producers in the world as of 2013. Additionally, the Minerals Council of Australia lists coal as the countries second largest export. This, combined with nine proposed “mega coal mines” in Queensland’s Galilee Basin, is a serious concern for Pacific Islanders and some of Australia’s residents.

Pacific climate warriors responded to this proposed expansion in a manner appropriate for the urgency climate change poses to Pacific Islands. On October 17th, in traditional canoes built over the last year in their homelands, they set out to block coal shipments for a day at Newcastle coal port.

“We traveled to Newcastle to highlight the impact of climate change, to share our stories with the rest of the world,” said climate warrior Arianne Kassman. “Hopefully I get Australia to reconsider their commitment to expanding the fossil fuel industry.”

The port at Newcastle is the largest in the world, in 2013 the port reached a record of 150.5 million tonnes in coal exports, a 12.5 percent increase from the previous year. It is this location that climate warriors deemed appropriate for a daylong flotilla, aimed at halting the ship’s export schedule and sending a peaceful, and powerful, message.

“We achieved a lot, we achieved the spirit of the people,” said climate warrior Mikaele Maiava. “To the information that we got, there’s about 8 to 10 coal ships that did not go through that port. It’s a beautiful feeling. It’s amazing.”

Five traditional canoes built on the warrior’s Islands led the flotilla, backed by hundreds of Australian’s in canoes in Kayaks. The day began with a welcome ceremony before warriors and activists launched from 10a-5p in attempt to stop the movement of coal ships for the entire day.

After this bold action was completed, climate warriors began a tour of the country to demonstrate the impacts of climate change to Australian residents on an individual level. October 17th- 23rd , 2014, warriors visited Brisbane River for an additional Flotilla, Canberra, Perth, Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane.

In the five years that 350 Pacific has been convened, the need for a permanent solution to the ever-mounting issues of climate change has become paramount. For example, in March the Marshall Islands declared a state of emergency after severe flooding. From this, over 1,000 people were forced to evacuate. Such events have become more frequent in the Islands, which average only 2 meters above sea level.

It is through stories such as these, which are unfortunately not unique, that the warriors aimed to use to raise awareness on their tour across Australia. Warriors hoped that by showing people that climate change is happening now, and not in the future, they could encourage more people to take a stand with the threatened Islands.

“Climate change is real, and we’re here to bring that message across that we live the realities of climate change,” said climate warrior George Nacewa. “We speak different languages and come from different cultures, but we are connected to the land and we are connected by the ocean.”

Source: http://www.culturalsurvival.org/news/pacific-warriors-canoe-climate-change 

Posted in Featured, News | Leave a comment

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

  • January  2015
    Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
       
      1 2 3 4
    5 6 7 8 9 10 11
    12 13 14 15 16 17 18
    19 20 21 22 23 24 25
    26 27 28 29 30 31  
  • Upcoming Events

    CSW59 – 2015

    CSW59/Beijing+20 (2015) The fifty-ninth session of the Commission on the Status of Women will take place at United Nations Headquarters in [...]

    Expert Group Meeting: “Dialogue on an optional protocol to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples”, 27 – 29 January 2015

    Title: Expert Group Meeting: “Dialogue on an optional protocol to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples”, [...]

Project Access

Project Access supports indigenous peoples’ participation in international meetings and conferences where decisions are being made that affect their rights, cultures and livelihoods.

Girls Education Program

Education, Leadership, and Rights Training for Indigenous Girls in East Africa.

Indigenous Entrepreneurship

This Program supports indigenous peoples' development of sustainable enterprises in their communities.